Bonanza News
Today is: Sunday, 10/02/22 -  Illegal Migrants Have Been Convinced To Sue De Santis For Sending Them To Martha's Vineyard: A Democrat Texas Sheriff is calling for an investigation. How are illegal migrants able to sue? Are we to investigate the busing without also asking why the Biden administration was flying migrants all over the US.Over 100 Migrants Appeared At The D.C. Home Of Kamala Harris After She Claims The US Border Is Secure: The migrants on the buses were from Colombia, Cuba, Guyana, Nicaragua, Panama, and Venezuela. Texas Governor Greg Abbott sent them there as a wake up call. When interviewed, they stated that the US border is wide open.Compensation For Downwinders Of Nuclear Fallout Has Been Temporarily Extended: RECA does not cover a huge portion of Mohave County. The county is 190 miles South of the Nevada Test Site. The exclusion was an "administrative error" according to Paul Gosar.Operation Lone Star Has Bused Thousands of Migrants From Texas to NY and DC: In Texas, 325.9 million lethal doses of fentanyl has been seized. People are dying from overdoses across the US.Freedom Of Speech And Due Process Under Attack In Alex Jones Defamation Trial: In a wild turn of events, Reynal "accidentally" sent an entire unredacted copy of Jones phone text message record spanning two years to the opposing lawyer. Now the FBI wants a copy of Jones leaked phone record for the purpose of investigating the "January 6 Capital Attack."

Bonanza News is an independent news media platform.

We cover current events, world history, and unpopular subjects.



Subscribe:

 

Read More:

Older Articles    Newer Articles




Extra:

In Fight Against ISIS, a Lose-Lose Scenario Poses Challenge for West:
Western powers are in a bind, analysts say, as ISIS is likely to continue pursuing attacks abroad in retaliation to the loss of territory in Iraq and Syria.


ISIS is in Afghanistan, But Who Are They Really?:
It appears ISIS-allied fighters are gaining a foothold in Afghanistan, but just how similar are they to the group's branches in Iraq and Syria?


“The Most Risky … Job Ever.” Reporting on “ISIS in Afghanistan”:
Najibullah Quraishi has covered the war in Afghanistan for more than a decade, but embedding with ISIS fighters who've recently emerged there "was the most risky and dangerous job ever I've done in my life," he says.


After Paris Attacks, CIA Head Reignites Surveillance Debate:
Just days after the attack in Paris, America’s top intelligence official suggested that recent leaks about classified surveillance programs were partially responsible.


WATCH: A Conversation With Teens in Training as ISIS Suicide Bombers:
As ISIS expands its reach into Afghanistan, it is training children and teenagers to become the next generation of jihadis.


What Happens When Police Are Forced to Reform?:
The Justice Department has intervened in troubled police departments for 20 years. Are reform efforts working?


Is It Too Late for Obama On Immigration Reform?:
Unless the Supreme Court acts fast, the window might be closed for President Obama on immigration reform.


Attorney General Orders FanDuel, DraftKings, Out of New York:
Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has issued a cease-and-desist order to the nation’s two largest daily fantasy sports companies, saying that the betting that takes place on their sites breaks New York's online gambling laws.


A Campaign of Disappearances in Syria Leaves Thousands Missing:
At least 65,116 individuals have been "forcibly disappeared" by the Syrian government, according to a new report by Amnesty International.


America, Iraq and the Legacy of Ahmad Chalabi:
Ahmad Chalabi helped lead the U.S. into war in Iraq, but if he ever had regrets about his role in the invasion, and the years of violence it unleashed, "he never voiced them to me," writes FRONTLINE correspondent Martin Smith.


Terror in Little Saigon:
From 1981 to 1990, five Vietnamese-American journalists were killed in what some suspected was a string of political assassinations. Why did the murders go unsolved?


Inside the Making of “Terror in Little Saigon”:
A.C. Thompson and Richard Rowley’s search for answers into the killings of five Vietnamese-American journalists took them from cities like Houston and San Francisco, to the jungles of Southeast Asia, to the corridors of power in Washington.


ISIS in Afghanistan: School of Jihad:
The emergence of ISIS in Afghanistan has introduced a new level of brutality to the conflict, beyond what has been practiced by the Taliban.


Coming in November on FRONTLINE:
This November, explore an unsolved string of murders from the past, and the dangerous new rise of ISIS in Afghanistan.


Inheritance:
The Lockerbie bombing left only fragments of David Dornstein's life behind, but their discovery gave his brother a new purpose -- to gather what went missing, preserve what was left, and work to make sense of it all. That story is told in this special interactive presentation.


17 Indicted in Bust of $32 Million Online Gambling Ring:
The online gambling ring allegedly used an offshore website to help book $32 million in illegal sports wagers placed by more than 2,000 bettors in the United States.


Pentagon Opens Probe Into Sexual Abuse by U.S. Allies in Afghanistan:
The Defense Department's Inspector General has opened an investigation into whether U.S. troops were discouraged from reporting the rape and sexual abuse of children by their Afghan allies.


Syria: What’s In It For Putin?:
For Russian President Vladimir Putin, Syria is not just about supporting the Assad regime in Syria. It's about Russia's place in the world.


A Journey “Inside Assad’s Syria”:
By the time Martin Smith reached Syria this past summer, the war was already in its fifth year, but life in regime-controlled areas was still largely a mystery.


Inside the Assad Regime’s Surreal “Summer in Syria” Campaign:
The Assad government sought to promote regime-sponsored cultural events through a marketing campaign called "Summer in Syria," but the effort didn't exactly go as planned.


Is Illegal Online Gambling Staying Completely Offshore?:
Nearly 10 years after Congress passed a law to curb online gambling, a new investigation finds offshore sites are not only still thriving, but in some cases routing crucial parts of their operations through equipment based in the U.S.


America’s Immigration Battle By the Numbers:
The U.S. has deported an average of 403,500 people each year during the Obama administration. What else do the numbers say about the nation's immigration system?


Has the U.S. Really Shifted on Deportations?:
A year after the Obama administration changed its policy on which undocumented immigrants it would target for deportation, it's not clear who is being sent back.


Watch How One Freedom Caucus Member Sees the GOP’s Latino Voter Problem:
"We're writing off too many people," Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-SC) says in "Immigration Battle," a feature film presentation from FRONTLINE and Independent Lens that airs tonight on PBS.


For Some Refugees, Safe Haven Now Depends on a DNA Test:
Changes to a program designed to reunite refugees with family in the U.S. have slowed -- and in some cases outright denied -- legitimate entries into the country.


DART spacecraft slams into asteroid:
The mission is a test to see if NASA could knock an Earth-bound asteroid off its path, should we ever need to.


Koalas have fingerprints almost identical to ours:
Koalas are the only non-primates with fingerprints. How is that possible—and why?


Malaria is outsmarting blood tests. Can a breath test help?:
A parasite that causes the most common form of malaria is evolving to be undetectable by current tests. Some scientists want to zero in on compounds in patients’ breath instead.


The ice cream that changed physics:
Sixty years ago a teenager’s homemade ice cream raised a surprisingly complicated question: Can hot liquids freeze faster than cold ones?


How air fryers work, scientifically speaking:
Here’s how hot air can “fry” food.


What happens when you season a cast iron pan:
Here is how oil and heat can form a durable coating.


The world’s oldest tree has competition:
Will a Patagonian cypress in Chile prove older than California’s most elderly bristlecone pine?


Why you can’t really overcook mushrooms:
Mushrooms are remarkably forgiving. Here’s the science of why.


A new game teaches financial literacy and decision-making:
How can you identify and overcome biases that hurt you financially? NOVA teamed up with Duke University’s Center for Advanced Hindsight to design the NOVA Financial Lab, a game that breaks down the behavioral science behind financial decision-making.


Dazzling first images from James Webb Space Telescope:
Images of five targets include the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date.


The science of fireworks:
And why it’s so hard to make blue ones.


How exercise may help prevent Alzheimer's:
Exercise could be a powerful defense against Alzheimer’s disease. Three dementia researchers explain how it works.


6 stinking cool facts about dog noses:
Dogs can sniff out disease and analyze new odors even as they exhale. But how?


Human tracks may be earliest evidence of people in North America:
Footprints in New Mexico’s White Sands National Park challenge scientists’ timeline of when humans first came to North America.


Scientists capture first-ever image of our galaxy’s supermassive black hole:
The Event Horizon Telescope team has captured the first image of Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way.


Daily life on the International Space Station: A Q&A with a space archaeologist:
Archaeologists are working to understand how astronauts really use their space on the ISS—and help improve space habitats of the future.


Adapting national parks for wheelchair hiking:
The trails through our public lands weren’t designed for wheelchairs, but new wheelchairs are designed for those trails. National Park Service accessibility specialist Quinn Brett wants parks to catch up with wheelchair technology, increasing access to American wilderness.


Why light pollution is a solvable environmental crisis:
Excessive outdoor lighting is deadly to animals and takes a toll on human health and wellbeing, too. But when it comes to large-scale environmental problems, this one may be a relatively easy fix.


How African Indigenous knowledge helped shape modern medicine:
In the 1700s, an enslaved man named Onesimus shared a novel way to stave off smallpox during the Boston epidemic. Here’s his little-told story, and how the Atlantic slave trade and Indigenous medicine influenced early modern science.


A day at a Florida manatee hospital:
As Florida’s seagrass beds die off, manatees are starving. Can the seagrass–and the manatees–make a comeback?


Astronomers successfully predict an asteroid impact above Iceland:
Two hours before asteroid 2022 EB5 entered Earth’s atmosphere, scientists knew exactly when and where the space rock would strike.


How magpies outwitted researchers in Australia:
During a recent study, a group of magpies removed their GPS trackers, astounding their observers. But were the birds actually trying to help each other?


A major Atlantic current is at a critical transition point:
New evidence suggests that the larger system the Gulf Stream is part of is approaching a tipping point that could cause dramatic shifts in global weather patterns.


Why Tonga’s volcanic eruption was so destructive:
Explore these NOVA resources to better understand the volcanology behind Tonga’s massive undersea eruption in January.


Epstein-Barr infection found to increase risk of multiple sclerosis:
The underlying cause of multiple sclerosis is not yet known, but Epstein-Barr virus is a possible culprit, Harvard researchers say.


Western monarch populations grew over 100-fold in 2021. Why?:
The beloved butterflies had fallen to critical levels in recent years. Experts weigh in on what might be causing their remarkable return.


OSIRIS-REx is bringing back an asteroid sample. What now?:
The debris NASA’s asteroid-touching spacecraft collected could help us learn about the origins of our solar system. But for that to happen, scientists have to protect it from just about everything.


NOVA's top 5 science stories of 2021:
Scientific advancements helped humans push through both the pandemic and the atmosphere this year, and a long-awaited visit from some underground insects set the country abuzz.


NOVA's top science education stories of 2021:
High school scientists dazzled us with their innovations—while new studies revealed insights about math mastery and how we can prepare young people for real-world challenges.


The James Webb Space Telescope team prepares for launch:
Here’s what the largest—and most expensive—infrared space telescope will set its sights on.


You didn't get sucked into a black hole. Now what?:
Not everything that crosses a supermassive black hole’s accretion disc gets spaghettified, astrophysicists say.


Deep learning tool helps NASA discover 301 exoplanets:
NASA scientists used a neural network called ExoMiner to examine data from Kepler, increasing the total tally of confirmed exoplanets in the universe.


10 spectacular Hubble Space Telescope images:
With the upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Hubble era is gradually drawing to a close. Here are some highlights from the countless wonders Hubble has shown us during its 31 years in space.


NASA launches mission to redirect an asteroid—by striking it with a spacecraft:
As the first-ever “full-scale planetary defense test” to deflect a space rock, the DART mission aims to show that protecting Earth from a hazardous asteroid is possible.


Astronomers watch a star explode in real time:
An international research team used Hubble, TESS, and other instruments to witness the “Rosetta Stone” of supernovas. Its findings could help astronomers predict when other stars in the universe are about to explode.


Cannabis doesn’t enhance performance. So why is it banned in elite sports?:
Here’s how cannabis use became prohibited—and the science of its biological, psychological, and social effects.


NOVA Universe Revealed Outreach Toolkit:
The NOVA Universe Revealed Community Outreach Toolkit contains strategies for organizing events around the content of the five-part series as well as examples of hands-on activities and a wide range of multimedia educational resources aligned to the content of each episode.


In a first, astronomers find a potential planet outside the Milky Way:
The exoplanet candidate is about the size of Saturn and located in a Whirlpool galaxy system 28 million light-years from Earth.


The Cannabis Question Outreach Toolkit and Community Events:


Extreme ivory poaching led to tuskless elephants in Mozambique:
As the country’s civil war decimated elephant populations, the proportion of tuskless females rose dramatically. A new study explains why the tuskless trend continued in peacetime.


Join the cannabis conversation with NOVA:
Tune in for three cannabis events exploring the nexus of cannabis science and policy.


NASA’s Lucy will be the first-ever mission to study Trojan asteroids:
By visiting 4-billion-year-old “fossil” space rocks, the Lucy mission hopes to reveal how our solar system, and its outer planets, formed.


Journey into the vastness of space with NOVA Universe Revealed events:
Join NOVA for several new events which highlight some of the most surprising characters in the cosmos as seen in the new space series NOVA Universe Revealed.


Dogs sniff out cremation ashes amid wildfire destruction:
With cremation on the rise, more Americans are keeping cremains of loved ones in their homes. As larger and fiercer wildfires destroy communities in the West, archaeologists are teaming up with scent detection dogs to find ashes among the ashes.


How aluminum wrap protects sequoias from wildfire:
The material, developed from fire shelters used by wildland firefighters, is often wrapped around at-risk buildings in national parks. Now, it’s protecting some of the biggest trees on Earth.


Covid-19 leads to global rise in unplanned pregnancy:
Millions of people have experienced contraceptive service disruptions because of the coronavirus pandemic, the U.N. found.


Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced:
From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.


Confront science misinformation in your classroom with NOVA:
Prepare students to make informed judgements about the science media they encounter, both online and at home.


A spacesuit designer on what to wear to the moon:
An engineer-artist duo wants to create sleeker spacesuits that meet the challenges of a low-pressure environment while offering more mobility—and looking cool.


The legendary Chinese seafarer the West overlooks:
In the 1400s, Zheng He sailed thousands of miles around Asia and Africa in ships the size of soccer fields, spreading Chinese innovations like compasses and gunpowder in the process.


Meet the women diversifying shark science:
Moving beyond Shark Week, these women-led groups teach thousands of students about the critical role sharks play in the marine ecosystem.


Oakland Zoo vaccinates its animals against Covid-19:
Lions and tigers and bears have been training for this moment (and it’s pretty cute).


Addressing vaccine hesitancy in Massachusetts’ hardest-hit community:
Healthcare providers, religious leaders, and public health officials are coming together in Chelsea, Mass., a predominantly Hispanic community, to inform and vaccinate residents against COVID-19.


The aerospace startup that's revolutionizing resource transport:
With a fleet of hybrid-powered autonomous aircraft, Elroy Air's Kofi Asante is working to democratize access to resources by changing how they are transported.


American Indians have the highest Covid vaccination rate in the US:
According to CDC data, Indigenous people are getting vaccinated quicker than any other group. Here are the successes—and challenges—of getting vaccines to urban Native American communities.


Asian American scientists in STEM classrooms: increasing inclusion and visibility:
Learn about Asian and Pacific Islander American scientists who have helped change the world, and the call for greater inclusion of their work in curriculum and textbooks.


The pandemic disrupted tens of thousands of IVF cycles:
In vitro fertilization is a costly, precisely timed process that takes two to three months per cycle. Covid-19 shut down fertility clinics and halted these cycles. What happens now?


Victory! Ingenuity conducts its first powered flight on Mars:
The 4-pound helicopter just became the first craft to achieve controlled, powered flight on a planet beyond Earth.


Meet the scientists building a prison-to-STEM pipeline:
New programs aim to help formerly incarcerated people enter careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.


What to expect during NASA’s first-ever Mars helicopter flight:
Want to fly a rotorcraft on another planet? Here’s what it takes.


Could tiny sensors keep methane out of our atmosphere—and homes?:
Methane is a greenhouse gas 86 times as potent as carbon dioxide. What if we could see methane emissions in real time?


Why Texas was not prepared for Winter Storm Uri:
The February storm left dozens of Texans dead and millions without power—and exposed an aging energy grid unprepared for a changing climate. Can we build something better?


Joint statement against anti-AAPI racism:
This week’s tragic killings in Atlanta are a continuation of the anti-Asian racism the country has seen for the past year. The attached letter is a joint statement reflecting our collective stand against this racism and for a commitment to fostering inclusivity in our country.


Could plastic made from bacteria guts help solve our waste crisis?:
Bioplastics called PHAs grow like beer and biodegrade like wood. And they may be able to help with our plastic waste problem.


What’s the deal with mink Covid?:
In the past year, millions of the animals have been culled to stop the spread of COVID-19 on mink farms across Europe. But this is more than just a fur coat crisis.


A physician on her grandfather’s experience as a minority in STEM—and the state of progress today:
Dr. Katherine Julian, the granddaughter of famed chemist Percy Julian, discusses her grandfather’s legacy—and how barriers for people of color in science still exist.


Take a Chemistry Field Trip with NOVA Education:
Join NOVA on four virtual field trips which highlight some of the scientists and engineers featured in the new chemistry series Beyond the Elements.


Communicating with a dreaming person is possible:
A study from four independent teams report that lucid dreaming during the REM sleep stage allows for two-way communication.


Success! Perseverance lands on Mars. Now its work begins:
Yesterday, NASA’s latest Mars rover touched down on the red planet. Here’s what its research team says is in store for the mission.


NASA's Mars Perseverance rover lands today:
Tuning in to the touchdown? Here’s what to expect.


From jumping horses to jalapeños: the science of spicy peppers:
Discover capsaicin, the active ingredient in chile peppers. (If you can take the heat.)


Meet the Site Coordinators of NOVA Science Studio:
The new national program will be led by five site coordinators and include 30 middle and high-school students grouped into regional cohorts from the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest, and West Coast.


NOVA’s ‘Decoding COVID-19’ receives 2021 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award:
The PBS science series was recognized for its 2020 documentary during last night’s ceremony “honoring the best in journalism.”


I got stung by a stingray, and all I got was this deeper understanding of venom medicine:
Animal venoms are useful for drugmakers because they’re potent, targeted, and fast-acting. Trust me, I would know.


Reflecting on the Power of Experiential Learning with Biologist Dr. Monica Hall-Porter:
The pandemic has significantly changed approaches to experiential learning with the shift to virtual classrooms. Monica Hall-Porter has found creative ways to model new methods for this type of pedagogy.


John Mansfield, former NOVA executive producer, dies at 84:
The Emmy-winning television producer and writer, who served as NOVA EP from 1980-1984, died on Sunday, Jan. 17.


I’ve been exposed to Covid-19. When should I get tested?:
Figuring out when to get tested after exposure requires understanding what happens once the virus enters your body. We’ve got you covered.


NOVA’s top 5 science stories of 2020:
Asteroid samples and strange space molecules wowed us—while past epidemics taught us valuable lessons.


Inaugural 'Black in X' Weeks Foster Inclusivity and Empowerment in STEM:
Discover how Black in STEM events defined 2020, and how science educators can harness the spirit of inclusiveness in the classroom.


Japan’s Hayabusa2 returns asteroid sample to Earth in “perfect condition”:
The sample, which is the second-ever to be successfully taken from a space rock and ferried back to Earth, could teach us about the origins of life.


Tongass National Forest is 'America's Last Climate Sanctuary':
Opening up the Tongass National Forest to additional logging and development could have serious implications for both the environment and the Alaska Native communities that depend on it.


3D models help preserve landmarks like Notre Dame:
Laser-scanning technology can create exceptionally detailed 3D models of cultural sites, bringing them to life online—and helping experts restore them if disaster strikes.


A third Covid-19 vaccine is effective and cheap. What happens next?:
The Pfizer, Moderna, and AstraZeneca vaccines are at least 90% effective, according to clinical trials. Here’s who may get vaccinated first.


Bring the Science of Taste into the Classroom with NOVA Resources:
Use these NOVA resources to introduce students to neuroscience, chemistry, and biology concepts that explain the science behind flavor, and how smell, sight, and sound can influence the experience.


Pfizer and Moderna Covid vaccines 95% effective in clinical trials:
Both vaccines performed excellently in clinical trials. What comes next?


Toxic synthetic 'forever chemicals' are in our water and on our plates:
What makes PFAS chemicals extremely useful—and extremely hard to get rid of—are the bonds between carbon and fluorine atoms that are almost impossible to break.


The 21st Century Threat to Wildlife is "Cyberpoaching":
The growth and accessibility of the internet has transformed the illegal wildlife trade.


The NOVA Science Studio Goes National:
This fall, we are excited to take the NOVA Science Studio to the national stage with a virtual launch of our program that will engage students across the country.


Armenia reckons with climate change and its Soviet past through reforestation:
A four-year fuel blockade in the 1990s threatened the tiny country’s forests. Ever since, it’s been replanting its trees—a task that’s more complicated than expected.


NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will stow asteroid Bennu sample early:
OSIRIS-REx scooped up so much rock, dust, and debris from Bennu that its sampling container became jammed, causing asteroid bits to leak into outer space. Now, the mission team is reassessing its sample stowing plans.


In a swirl of rocks and dust, OSIRIS-REx probe touches an asteroid:
Despite concerns that the surface of Bennu might be too rocky, the probe’s touchdown produced a dramatic shower of debris, opening the way for future insights into the mysteries of our solar system.


Where Science and Social Justice Meet:
Join NOVA Education for three virtual events dedicated to the intersection of STEM education and social justice.


NASA probe will attempt to grab a piece of an asteroid on Tuesday:
OSIRIS-REx will have just three chances to touch down and snag a sample of the asteroid Bennu as it zooms through space some 204 million miles from Earth.


Interview: National Geographic marine life photographer Cristina Mittermeier:
World-renowned photographer Cristina Mittermeier explains her philosophy behind conservation photography, mentorship, and the increased diversity she would like to see within the environmental movement.


The secret to peace between elephants and farmers in Mozambique? Bees:
Scientists use animals’ “landscapes of fear” to set limits and reestablish balance in Gorongosa National Park, where top predators were wiped out.


A calligrapher writes with light to keep tradition alive:
Equipped with a light and a camera, Karim Jabbari hopes his work can serve as a link between conservative traditional calligraphy and our augmented reality.


Search for Exoplanets with the NOVA Exoplanet Lab:
You've been selected to be the lead scientist for the NOVA Space Center’s Galactic Resettlement team, with the job of finding suitable exoplanets for displaced aliens desperately seeking new homes. Are you up to the challenge?


The evolving, unexpected power of the emoji:
We use emoji in texts and other messaging to set a tone, maintain relationships, and show solidarity. But are they also changing the way we think?


Finding My Voice:
Biomedical engineer, Khari Johnson, explains how underrepresentation in STEM fields is not due to lack of interest, aptitude or talent, but instead due to a number of systemic barriers.


Eight smart things slime molds can do without a brain:
From remembering where they’ve been to recreating the Tokyo rail network, these “slimy aliens” are capable of way more than we give them credit for.


DALL-E is now available to all. NPR put it to work:
Ever wonder what Nina Totenberg would look like dunking a basketball in space? An Edith Piaf Tiny Desk concert? With the AI-generated art tool now released to the public, you no longer have to.


In a bio-engineered dystopia, 'Vesper' finds seeds of hope:
In the sci-fi drama Vesper, the title character is a 13 year old bio-hacker who lives in a future where humankind has wiped out all edible plants.


Texts released ahead of Twitter trial show Elon Musk assembling the deal:
Elon Musk's takeover of Twitter went down via private text messages between the Tesla CEO and a small circle of Silicon Valley's rich and powerful, according to court filings released this week.


The Telegram app has a global doxing issue:
The messaging and social media app Telegram has a major doxing problem. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with writer Peter Guest, who reported on the global issue in Wired.


Will Bed Bath & Beyond sink like Sears or rise like Best Buy? :
The company has been on a rollercoaster of crises, including a meme-stock rise and crash. Its latest financial report comes Thursday.


This is what NASA's spacecraft saw just seconds before slamming into an asteroid:
NASA successfully crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid on Monday night. These are the final images it captured as it hurtled toward the rocky surface.


Facebook takes down Russian network impersonating European news outlets:
Meta says it has disrupted a large Russian network of fake accounts pushing a pro-Kremlin view of the war in Ukraine and a separate Chinese campaign targeting the U.S. midterm elections.


Brazilians are about to vote. And they're dealing with familiar viral election lies:
As Brazilians head to the polls to vote for president, they're being deluged by a wave of falsehoods that echo Donald Trump's claims of a stolen election.


Google celebrates NASA's DART mission with a new search gimmick:
In celebration of NASA's DART mission, searching for information about it will result in an animation and tipped screen.


Move over, Bruce Willis: NASA crashed into an asteroid to test planetary defense:
NASA successfully crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid in a test of planetary defense. Now it will determine whether the mission was able to alter the asteroid's course.


He spent decades recording soundscapes. Now they're going to the Library of Congress:
Jim Metzner has traveled far and wide to record sounds of the world and share them with listeners. The Library of Congress will preserve thousands of tapes and other items dating back to the 1970s.


In Chile's desert lie vast reserves of lithium — key for electric car batteries:
Chile is part of a South American region known as the "lithium triangle," where miners are trying to meet skyrocketing demand for the material.


U.S. lets tech firms boost internet access in Iran following a crackdown on protesters:
The move authorizes firms to offer more social media and collaboration platforms, video conferencing and cloud-based services in Iran following a crackdown on protests over the death of Mahsa Amini.


Stewart Brand reflects on a lifetime of staying "hungry and foolish":
From hippie culture to the first personal computers, Stewart Brand has been key to some of the most groundbreaking movements of the last century. This hour, he reflects on his life and career.


Twitch bans some gambling content after an outcry from streamers:
The streaming giant said it would prohibit content that included unlicensed slots, roulette, or dice games. Sports betting, fantasy sports, and poker will still be permitted on Twitch.


The Best Gear for Your Home Emergency Kit:
Channel your inner Mad Max and prepare for disaster and all-around bad weeks with these WIRED-approved essentials.


Casio’s Flagship Keyboard Has a Voice of Its Own:
This starter keyboard can sing your song lyrics back to you.


How God of War Made Accessibility a Core Part of Its Game Design:
For the Ragnarok sequel, Santa Monica Studio incorporated regular feedback from disabled gamers, hosted public conversations on social media, and more.


19 Android Settings You May Not Know About:
From using less mobile data to live captions for videos, these settings will make your phone run more smoothly.


Self-Taught AI May Have a Lot in Common With the Human Brain:
Neural networks can use self-supervised learning to figure out what matters. This process might be what helps humans do the same.


The Zero SR/S EV Sport Bike Feels More Like a Cruiser:
We took it out for a spin to see whether an electric motorcycle could still be a gas to ride.


GrowWithJo Is the Only Workout App I’ve Ever Liked:
Its focus on health and wellness—rather than sculpting a perfect body—has actually made exercising a little fun.


The 5 Best Water Leak Detectors for Your Home:
Don’t let busted pipes or an overflowing washing machine dampen your day. These WIRED-tested smart water sensors can reduce the risk of damage to your home.


Microsoft Exchange Server Has a Zero-Day Problem:
Plus: CIA failures allegedly got US informants killed, a former NSA worker is charged under the Espionage Act, and more.


Razer Teases a New Handheld Gaming Console:
Plus: Intel’s new app syncs PCs and mobile phones, and Apple slows down iPhone production.


The Drying Up of Europe’s Great Rivers Could Be the New Normal:
From the Danube to the Loire, these lifelines for the continent’s economy are running low after five months of brutal drought and years of dry weather.


16 Best International Coffee Day Deals on Beans and Machines:
Celebrate your favorite drink with discounts on home barista essentials.


How to Make Discord Look and Feel Like Slack:
One of the best things about the free chat service is how you can customize it to work for you.


How to Watch NFL Football on a Streaming Service:
Stream the big game without cable—or get sacked.


The Problem With Mental Health Bots:
With human therapists in short supply, AI chatbots are trying to plug the gap—but it’s not clear how well they work.


I Uncovered an Army of Fake Men on Hinge:
They had gleaming teeth, perfect hair, and selfies with baby animals. But could they pass the Turing test?


10 Great Deals on TVs, Headphones, and Gaming Accessories:
Upgrade your home theater and score some sweet discounts on peripherals this weekend.


The Challenge of Cracking Iran’s Internet Blockade:
People around the world are rallying to subvert Iran's internet shutdown, but actually pulling it off is proving difficult and risky.


Bot Hunting Is All About the Vibes:
At the heart of every bot-detection tool is a human's gut feeling—and all the messiness that comes with it.


The Best USB Flash Drives for Ultra-Portable Storage:
These WIRED-tested memory sticks are a virtual filing cabinet in your pocket.